abate

verb
\ ə-ˈbāt How to pronounce abate (audio) \
abated; abating

Definition of abate

intransitive verb

1 : to decrease in force or intensity waiting for the storm to abate
2a : to become defeated or become null or void (as of a writ or appeal)
b : to decrease in amount or value The legacies abated proportionately.

transitive verb

1a : to put an end to abate a nuisance
b : nullify sense 1 abate a writ
2a : to reduce in degree or intensity : moderate may abate their rancor to win peace
b : to reduce in value or amount : to make less especially by way of relief abate a tax
3 : deduct, omit abate part of the price
4a : to beat down or cut away so as to leave a figure in relief
b obsolete : blunt

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Other Words from abate

abater noun

Choose the Right Synonym for abate

abate, subside, wane, ebb mean to die down in force or intensity. abate stresses the idea of progressive diminishing. the storm abated subside implies the ceasing of turbulence or agitation. the protests subsided after a few days wane suggests the fading or weakening of something good or impressive. waning enthusiasm ebb suggests the receding of something (such as the tide) that commonly comes and goes. the ebbing of daylight

synonyms see in addition decrease

Examples of abate in a Sentence

For a while, in the Cold War's aftermath, the public fascination for espionage may abate, though somehow I doubt it. — John le Carré, Boston Globe, 19 Nov. 1989 At about six, as the heat abated, people began to crowd the streets and marketplaces, and to fill the cafés. — Milton Viorst, New Yorker, 12 Oct. 1987 But his attitude of sullen grievance and simmering fury never abated fully. — Joseph Heller, God Knows, 1984 We waited for the wind to abate. interest in the author's home abated as her novels waned in popularity
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Recent Examples on the Web The state government expanded restrictions on Sunday after three weeks of lockdown in Melbourne, Victoria’s capital, failed to abate the outbreak in the city of 5 million people. Bloomberg.com, "California Cases Accelerate; Birx Sees ‘New Phase’: Virus Update," 2 Aug. 2020 Dallas County will also abate $243,000 a year in tax revenue rather than the original plan of $255,000 annually. Dom Difurio, Dallas News, "Uber to launch grocery delivery in Dallas, even as it ratchets back Deep Ellum hiring goals," 10 July 2020 In this market, his analysis suggests, the incentives driving supply are unlikely to abate. Aziz Huq, Washington Post, "Political lies aren’t new, but the methods of spreading them are," 25 June 2020 If the outbreak continues to abate in France, the government says nightclubs should be allowed to reopen in September along with trade fairs and international cruises. BostonGlobe.com, "Saudi Arabia to hold ‘very limited’ hajj due to virus," 22 June 2020 Experts say social isolation, grief, fear and uncertainty are already pervasive, and those feelings will not automatically abate when physical distancing ceases or because a handful of police officers are arrested after centuries of racial violence. Alia E. Dastagir, USA TODAY, "'A culmination of crises': America is in turmoil, and a mental health crisis looms next," 21 June 2020 The larger conclusion from this latest volley of attacks is that the exploits besieging Intel aren’t likely to abate any time soon. Dan Goodin, Ars Technica, "Plundering of crypto keys from ultrasecure SGX sends Intel scrambling again," 9 June 2020 In eerie silence, Bayern closes in on Bundesliga title Bursting The Bubble Before the pandemic struck, football's upward spending curve had shown few signs of abating. Aleks Klosok, CNN, "'Back To Reality': European soccer prepares for age of austerity," 1 June 2020 With some provinces closing their borders to migrant labor entirely, the labor shortage shows no sign of abating. Shelly Hagan, BostonGlobe.com, "Migrant-friendly Canada struggles to attract migrant farm staff," 21 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'abate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of abate

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for abate

Middle English abaten, borrowed from Anglo-French abatre "to strike down, fell, reduce, put an end to," from a-, prefix in transitive verbs (going back to Latin ad- ad-) + batre "to beat," going back to Latin battuere, of uncertain origin

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Time Traveler for abate

Time Traveler

The first known use of abate was in the 14th century

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Statistics for abate

Last Updated

11 Aug 2020

Cite this Entry

“Abate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/abate. Accessed 15 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for abate

abate

verb
How to pronounce abate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of abate

: to become weaker : to decrease in strength

abate

verb
\ ə-ˈbāt How to pronounce abate (audio) \
abated; abating

Kids Definition of abate

: to make or become less The flood abated slowly.

Other Words from abate

abatement \ -​mənt \ noun The noise continued without abatement.

abate

verb
\ ə-ˈbāt How to pronounce abate (audio) \
abated; abating

Legal Definition of abate

transitive verb

1a : to put an end to or do away with abate a nuisance
b : to make void : nullify abate an action
2 : to reduce in amount especially proportionately abate a tax

intransitive verb

1 : to become defeated or become null or void when a public officer who is a party to an appeal…in an official capacity dies…the action does not abateFederal Rules of Appellate Procedure Rule 43
2 : to decrease in amount or value the legacies abated proportionately

Note: A problem arises in estate law when the amount of the bequests and devises made in a will exceeds the assets available in the estate. In such a case, some or all of the bequests and devises may have to be abated to make up the deficit. Under the Uniform Probate Code, property in the estate that is not given under the will abates first, residuary devises abate second, general devises abate third, and specific devises abate last.

History and Etymology for abate

Old French abattre, literally, to knock down, from a-, prefix stressing result + battre to beat

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More from Merriam-Webster on abate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for abate

Spanish Central: Translation of abate

Nglish: Translation of abate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of abate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on abate

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